Ten of the Most Viewed Videos on YouTube

Today, the most popular videos on YouTube only have a little in common with the most distinct ones in the past. Child-friendly videos such as Chocolate Rain and Charlie Bit My Finger easily gained a spot in YouTube’s most viewed content back then. But now, child-friendly music videos coming from artists like Ed Sheeran and Justine Bieber have managed to be into the top spots. Music videos have done a good job of entering the list of the most popular videos ever watched in the history of YouTube. Regardless of its genre, music videos seem to have a huge appeal to viewers regardless of different ages. If you want the same growth for your YouTube channel, here’s what you need to have.

Continue Reading

Markiplier, PewDiePie, Jake Paul and More of the Highest-Paid YouTubers in 2019

Markiplier, PewDiePie, Jake Paul and More of the Highest-Paid YouTubers in 2018

Markipler is now considered as one of the highest-paid YouTube personalities with his $17.5 million earnings during a 12-month scorching period.

Mark Fischbach or more commonly known as Markiplier by his fans is a native of Hawaii. It was in 2012 when he launched his YouTube channel when he was studying at the University of Cincinnati under the biomedical engineering program. During that time, he was going through a tough situation. He had broken up with his girlfriend, lost his desk job, and had surgery to remove his adrenal gland tumor that surgeons discovered when they took out his appendix. 

Continue Reading

How Can YouTube Views Be A Dangerous Thing?

In the first episode of Rabbit Hole, Kevin’s new audio series, featured Caleb Cain, a college dropout who lives in West Virginia. Cain found himself watching a lot of YouTube videos that contain extreme topics. In fact, Cain started to believe in the things he absorbed from watching, such as misogyny, racism, as well as conspiracy theories.

How Can YouTube Views Be A Dangerous Thing
Continue Reading

YouTube Views Don’t Count in Album Charts Says Billboard Magazine

The decision is brought about by the pressure it is getting from various music labels as well as Apple Music. Back then, music bought from Apple’s download store or streamed via its paid subscription service has the same weight with free streams on YouTube when counted n Billboard’s Hot 100. However, Billboard announced that it is going to prioritize paid streams, which means that there will be a possibility for artists to promote their songs on paid services like Apple more than it does on free streaming sites. Of course, artists will choose to advertise on platforms that will give them more chances to top up on the Hot 100 chart.

YouTube Views Don't Count in Album Charts Says Billboard Magazine
Continue Reading

Top 7 YouTube Channels Jobseekers Should View

Top 10 YouTube Channels Jobseekers Should View

It can be surprising to many to know that YouTube is not exclusively for entertainment purposes. There are many top YouTube channels today dedicated to helping Job Seekers. All are top career experts with entertaining YouTube channels that share exciting and helpful tips to guide job seekers.

YouTubers can be a goldmine of resources you can find on various YouTube channels that will set you apart from the crowd. From how to dress to body language, how to have a good handshake, interview etiquette, and many more, you will get a dedicated YouTube channel to help you.

Continue Reading

10 Best Ways To Promote YouTube For More Views

10 Best Ways To Promote YouTube For More Views

Do you own a YouTube account, and you have been wondering how to grow your audience? Don’t panic; here is the right place for you. Here, we would give you all you need to know about promoting your video views on the channel.

Continue Reading

The New Changes To YouTube’s Policy in 2020

The New Changes To YouTubes Policy in 2020

Following a letter from a large number of content creators in the wake of Donald Trump’s presidential election win, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki has announced some changes to the way YouTube views and videos will be selected and defined.

Video creators who are part of YouTube’s Creators for Change program will continue to give a direct say in what their videos selecting for, Wojcicki explained in a blog post. Her new upload policy will officially go into effect on July 1, 2020.

While YouTube does not currently have a search function, YouTube creators will still have the option to choose from a few search filters for their videos.

The New Changes To YouTubes Policy

YouTube Policy Changes Of The Past

In 2016, YouTube changed its policy on disabling ads and promoting premium content based on user activity. Since that event, advertisers have been more demanding, and some are stopping advertising altogether. Their policy on buying YouTube views has not changed.

In the aftermath of the YouTube policy change, YouTube has been trying to gain revenue by adding the most popular videos into their subscription services and licensing advertising. However, the company can only make that money with subscription services users purchase. The famous YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki said that in the future, they would be able to “cash in” on those subscriptions as well.

YouTube Has A New Policy for 2020

Recently, YouTube announced an extensive and much anticipated new video policy just last week, which aims to address some of the issues around managing mature content on the site. This announcement includes over flagging, the creation of content that’s inappropriate or offensive, and the adverse effects these could have on young viewers. It’s worth noting that YouTube isn’t saying exactly how it will change their site for people aged 17 and under to comply with this new policy. Still, they did say that they’ll do it by updating their systems to “contain age-appropriate content at more relevant times.”

The move means that there will now be a more difficult decision for children and young adults when it comes to watching YouTube content.

YouTube Has Made Big Changes For Everyone

These updates mark a significant change for the site, as well as YouTube itself. YouTube sues content creators using their trademarked service without prior consent.

This updated policy helps us work with people who are building a following, and we will always work with creators who are following our guidelines. Try requesting a review of your removed video if it ever happens.

YouTube’s Content ID Policy in 2020

In a recent post, the company asked about an article by Boing Boing’s Cory Doctorow and Lawrence Lessig.

The article talked about YouTube’s intention to review fair use for everyone involved.

The Content ID system works to help identify and remove infringing content. YouTube is creating a system that will provide their special algorithm to recognize fair use within its platform better.

Changes To YouTubes Policy

YouTube Might Be A Safe Space

This change may not necessarily make YouTube the safest place to share your videos. YouTube secretly has a dedicated decision-making process. We may never know what really goes on behind the scenes. If the YouTube policy does make YouTube more a place to watch videos, users will still be able to tell that content is flagged.

Further, authorities can always use that information in making their own decisions about what content should be flagged. Still, one of the biggest fans of the crackdown last week was also one of the most vocal critics of it.

YouTube’s Changes Inside the United Kingdom for 2020

If YouTube wants to promote its Content ID system — the proprietary system that identifies original, third-party content and licensing it for advertisers — a better course of action is to allow real advertising within site. It’s also about protecting your video from more malicious and unlawful content uploaders.

While the Content ID policy intended to make video creators better aware of who is watching their content, a well-meaning friend has shared

YouTube Policy on Ads Of 2020 and Beyond

If YouTube moves to sell ads and puts pressure on advertisers, then those advertisers may be at an advantage. Advertisers would have more leverage over YouTube than they did in 2013 when YouTube introduced its programmable ad system. Technology that lets advertisers automatically set viewing limits for individual viewers and schedule times to show ads is new. More pressure on marketers would create a more successful YouTube content creator — necessarily, a channel focused on making content.

More On YouTube Advertising Changes for 2020

YouTube is considering a decision to have its policy change by the year 2020. Pricing and profits are two of the biggest drivers of advertising revenue on YouTube.

Facebook is the largest advertiser on YouTube. YouTube is still one of the most targeted platforms for audiences. A ton of their advertising dollars continues to end up on YouTube.

YouTube Launched “Stories” Feature, Just Like Instagram

Since it was added as a feature on Instagram and Facebook, Stories has become a major staple of our social media life. In fact, Instagram has the highest number of users this year with over 400 million daily. It has even surpassed Snapchat and Facebook.

Who would have thought that this kind of posting format will hit big? Its popularity encouraged even other platforms to include it as one of their features. Netflix and Airbnb are now following in the popularity of this social media format. Not only that, YouTube is trying to also incorporate it into its platform.

YouTube is launching a “Stories” format and called it “Reels”. The video tech giant is currently testing it with its YouTube creators that has over 10,000 subscribers. It was successful with Instagram. Now, the question is, will it be successful with YouTube?

Do creators and subscribers really need this kind of format in the platform?

Features of YouTube Reels

YouTube is trying to create a not so similar Stories format for its platform. One is the people who have access to it.  

In Instagram, anyone with the account can post their stories. However, with YouTube, posting Reels is only a feature available to creators with large followings. And instead of the normal 24 hours, the Reel gets to stay in their account for a week or seven long days. YouTube is also allowing multiple stories which are very different with Instagram and Snapchat.

Subscribers will be able to find the creator’s stories in the Subscriptions tab, while for non-subscribers, it will be in the “Up next” list. On the other hand, just like Instagram’s Stories, there will also be some editing features in Reels. Creators can add filters, music, stickers to their video stories.

What is also good is that viewers can add a comment on the Reels. They can also comment with thumbs up or thumbs down or even give a heart icon if they like the video.

YouTube Communities

Since YouTube is only opening the Reel features to creators with over 10,000 subscribers, we can say that it is trying to build its communities. It also aims to promote channels as well as increase engagement.

Other creators have already started using the feature. They used it to create behind the scene accounts for the videos that they are creating and will be publishing in the platform. This creates an exciting feeling for the viewers and YouTube subscribers.

With this feature, YouTube is encouraging its users to stay on the platform, especially for its creators. Now creators don’t need to head to Facebook, Instagram or other social media to post updates on their videos or accounts. They can use YouTube Reels to do that. They can update their viewers easier and in a low key way.

YouTube Reels is also a good opportunity for creators who occasionally creates videos. They can close the gaps by updating its viewers of what is happening to them. On the other hand, for vloggers who are posting frequently, using Reels may be a redundancy for them.

In the end, Reels is about making creators stay with the platform and increasing their audience engagement.

Mix reactions

Creators and users have mixed reactions about YouTube Reels. Some say that YouTube is just jumping into the bandwagon of the Stories and it really does not need it. Another is that YouTube is just limiting it to its well-followed creators. It means there is no opportunity for budding YouTubers or small startups to try the feature.

Perhaps, the reason for this is that YouTube is trying to crack down and weed out inappropriate content on its platform. It is also cutting advertising rights to creators who are producing explicit content or graphical images.

On the other hand, other creators think that it is not reasonable to cut out advertising privileges just because the creator is touching the subjects of sex, mental health, and politics.

The problem with YouTube’s algorithm is that creators with high following continue to flourish, while those small and starting creators are bound to fail. This is because YouTube’s algorithm only favors those that have a sustainable following. They monetize them, while those that are small failed to get the monetization that they need since they are not given the right amount of exposure on the platform.

Using Reels, it is only another way to help those who have established accounts to flourish more. If Reels aim is to build community, wouldn’t be right to allow others to use it so other communities will be bigger? Also, it will help small or budding creators to create bigger communities?

10,000 subscribers may just be a small number for others. But with many YouTubers out there, it is hard to compete for attention. Thus, it is not easy to reach this number in a short period of time. Worse, those unfortunate creators have been in the platform for a long time and still fail to hit the 1000 subscriber mark.

It is also hard to gauge if Reels will be able to get audience engagement since the only indicator that you will have is comments and the reactions of the viewers.

Its purpose of audience engagement is good. However, if no one is using it, then it is a useless feature.

Advertising

With Reels, brands can also use it to promote their product or campaign. They can create a poll, snippets or behind the scene footages.

It will be the same with Instagram. However, the big question is, will brands use Reels if they are already successful in using Instagram? Are they ready to take a risk in using another platform for their brand?

Remember paid ads on social media is not cheap. And trying to use all possible social media and social media features will surely cost your brands heaps of money. So better to think carefully and decide wisely which one will be effective for your brand. And if Instagram is effective for you, will you still move to other platforms, whether that platform has the same feature and purpose?

This feature is new. And it is hard to imagine a lot of people taking and consuming it in a short period of time. Furthermore, if it is not their platform, they won’t bother checking it out or much more use it.

These YouTube Reels is an interesting experiment. However, only the changes in the digital trends will tell if it will be successful just like with Instagram. Facebook and Snapchat has a steady follower on their own Story features, but will that mean the same for YouTube?

Increase Your YouTube Views with These 10 Easy Tactics

Increase Your YouTube Views with These 10 Easy Tactics

Many of us use YouTube for personal or business purposes. If you own a YouTube channel, then you know how frustrating it can be to build and grow one. Due to the heavy competition on the video platform, you have to work harder and smarter in order to make your YouTube channel reach a wider audience.

If you like to increase your YouTube views and grow your YouTube channel, you have to apply the right tactics. Here are 10 easy tactics you can implement right away to establish a bigger presence on YouTube.

Optimize your videos with the right keywords

Before people can appreciate your YouTube videos, they have to be able to search your videos first. You can make your videos searchable on YouTube and other search engines by using the right keywords. For instance, the video title must match the words people would use to search for your video. Once you crafted a nice title, test it by running a YouTube search with your chosen keywords. If there is no result or if your video did not come up, try rephrasing the title by thinking like your audience or using keywords used by your top competitors.

Organize your videos into playlists

Make it easy for visitors to view all the videos on your YouTube channel. Do that by organizing your videos, and a good way is to create playlists that will group videos according to types.

Grab attention with thumbnails

Pick the best scenes in your video as your thumbnail. People will get a good preview about your video through those small, clickable images. By using attractive, catchy, relevant thumbnails, you should be able to pique your viewers’ interest and have them click, watch, and like your video.

Check out how to do custom thumbnails with this video tutorial:

Make a channel trailer

A trailer for your YouTube channel will be good for your branding and establish a unique first impression. A trailer will encourage viewers to keep coming back to see more of your interesting stuff. YouTube expert and consultant Alan Spicer shared some tips on how to make a good channel trailer:

Have a clear call-to-action (CTA)

People may enjoy your video, but they have this tendency to forget subscribing to your channel or liking your video. It’s up to you then to remind them to do such things by putting a clear call-to-action (CTA). Post the CTA at least at the start and at the end of the video so that people won’t miss doing what you want them to do. Look again at Allan Spicer’s tutorial on making a channel trailer above; he mentioned CTAs multiple times in that video.

Have a consistent schedule

Consistent video uploads let people know that you are involved in and dedicated to growing your YouTube channel. People follow channels they find interesting, but they will lose interest and unfollow you if they don’t have new content in weeks or months. Having an upload schedule (say, on a Wednesday) will make people anticipate your upcoming videos and encourage them to watch regularly.

Cross-promote your videos

Cross-promotion is a winning strategy you shouldn’t ignore. By filling out your social media profiles with embedded links of your YouTube videos, you can bring in more people from other platforms to visit your channel.

On the other hand, you can also encourage your current YouTube followers to share your videos on their own accounts. This will also widen the reach of your YouTube videos.

Create videos for trending topics

While you have a niche to target, it wouldn’t hurt to make videos on trending topics a part of your video marketing strategy. Take for instance those video creators who rode on Fortnite’s wave; the videos aren’t necessarily about the game, but these video creators were able to get millions of views by leveraging Fortnite’s popularity. Just like this Fortnite Dance Challenge that has been popularized by the Eh Bee Family:

If you want to know what trending topics to use, you can check out YouTube itself, visit Twitter, or use keyword tools.

Collaborate with fellow YouTubers

Reach out to people within your niche, whose values and content are aligned with yours. By collaborating with other YouTube channel owners, you can promote your channels with each other’s audiences and possibly gain an all a new set of subscribers.

Do contests or giveaways

You can generate more engagement within a short period by running a contest or giveaway. The prizes don’t have to be costly, but you have to ensure that it’s something that your followers will be interested in. You can also explore collaborating with other brands for those prizes. In this manner, you and that brand will both benefit from the attention generated by your contest or giveaway.

Make sure to follow YouTube’s contest rules and guidelines. Failing to do so can result in punishment for your channel.

If you include any of these 10 strategies into your YouTube marketing strategy, you’ll be able to amass those precious YouTube views and subs over time. Start implementing these tactics today, and see your YouTube channel grow in no time.

The Minefield YouTube is in Because of Kidfluencers

The Minefield YouTube is in Because of Kidfluencers In 2018, the highest-earning person on YouTube was a seven-year-old boy named Ryan. Forbes reported that Ryan ToysReview earned around $22 million from June 1, 2017 to June 1, 2018. That amount is before tax and operational fees are deducted, but that is still quite a lot for a seven-year-old kid. His parents won’t confirm, but Ryan has endorsement deals with several toy companies since Ryan ToysReview YouTube channel started in 2015 (when Ryan was only three years old).

Ryan is not the only child on YouTube though. There’s also Jojo Siwa, a 15-year-old YouTube content creator who had posted multiple videos from a Target Store. Why Target? Because she has branded apparel lines with the general merchandise store chain. In one video, she bought one piece each of her merchandise. Another video showed Jojo treating her younger brother to a $500 shopping spree, still in a Target Store.

 

When you finish watching these kidfluencers’ videos (whether they are toy review, vlogs, or YouTube gaming channels), more videos targeted at kids are suggested on the sidebar or below the video. In fact, Ryan’s ToysReview YouTube channel has this tagline: “Toys review for kids by a kid!” As there are so many child influencers on YouTube right now influencing millions of children all over the world, it’s becoming difficult to monitor and regulate. This puts Google in a legal and ethical minefield, and it’s not clear how they intend to go about it.

Regulating advertisements with kidfluencers

Dona Fraser, the director of the Children’s Advertising Review Unit, said in a statement, “The uptick in sponsored content and child influencers is very overwhelming. This has exploded in front of our eyes. How do you now wrangle every child influencer out there?”

Since it started in 2015, YouTube had always operated under (or beyond) the radar of traditional advertising rules. This could be due to the following reasons:

  • The site has grown so much that regulating it is becoming more difficult. There are one billion active users each month. There are around 23 million YouTube channels, with more being created every day. That’s a huge crowd to police. What’s more, there are over 8 million children using the YouTube Kids tool.
  • It’s difficult to distinguish which content is ads and which ones are not. There are creators making sponsored content which masquerade as creative content, and kids are the most susceptible to this kind of programming. It’s different for the TV industry since everyone knows that ads are inserted during breaks. There is a clear distinction between what are ads and not ads… Except for sponsored placements in shows, which are usually disclosed in the credits.

In 2017, the Federal Trade Commission warned Instagram influencers to properly disclose if a post is sponsored by a company. That is why you can see some Instagram posts by influencers tagged as sponsored, labeled as a “paid partnership” with a brand or company, or simply have #ad in them.

 

 

As for YouTube, tagging a video with a “paid for by” text that runs throughout the video is a major turn off to most viewers. This is according to Kristine Pack of Family Fun Pack, a YouTube channel which has eight million subscribers and dozens of sponsored videos. Nonetheless, Pack stated that she always disclose when her video posts are sponsored.

YouTube has this to say, “YouTube content creators are responsible for ensuring their content complies with local laws, regulations and YouTube Community Guidelines, including paid product placements. If the content is found to violate these policies, we take action, which can include removing content.”

Are children even allowed on YouTube?

YouTube has evaded rules about children on TV and ads, probably because of the age restriction stated on its terms of service. It says there that only children 13 years old and above can use YouTube:

 

However, it’s clear that children or their parents aren’t telling the children’s true age when signing up. You can clearly see this by just looking at all the videos targeted at smaller kids, most of which are suggested at the end of a toy review or any video with children on them.

“If they really were honest brokers about whether kids were allowed on the platform, they wouldn’t have so much kids’ content,” Colby Zintl, vice president for Common Sense Media, pointed out. Common Sense Media is urging Congress to strengthen policies in allowing children to use social media sites like Google and Facebook.

To address this problem of younger children using the video content site, Google launched YouTube Kids, a mobile app version targeted at kids younger than 13 years old.

 

YouTube Kids supposedly does not show sponsored videos. YouTube can filter such videos; there is a checkbox that video uploaders should tick if they receive money or free products when they upload the video to the main YouTube site. Despite this initiative, YouTube Kids was muddled with controversies such as:

  • There are still sponsored videos on YouTube Kids: The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood found sponsored content uploaded by famous influencers. This could mean two things: either the uploaders aren’t being honest and aren’t ticking the right checkbox, or that Google is not serious about filtering videos on the kids’ app.
  • There are still inappropriate contents on YouTube Kids: Advocacy groups for consumers and children complained to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) that YouTube Kids contained content inappropriate for children. They say that there are vulgarity, sexual language, and jokes about pedophilia on the mobile app.

All these things show how difficult it is for YouTube to monitor all contents on its site. In 2017, the company attempted a major cleanup by purging thousands of videos aimed at kids that have inappropriate content. However, this wasn’t enough.

Just this February of 2019, a blogger exposed how easy it was to access pedophile-related contents on YouTube because they ride on innocent video clips of children. This revelation prompted advertisers such as Disney, Fortnite, and Hasbro to suspend their advertising on YouTube.

As a response, Google deleted hundreds of accounts that left pedophile-oriented comments. They also disabled the comment section of some videos that feature minors.

Josh Golin, executive director of Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, said, “YouTube is pretending not to be a site for children when it suits them. And yet they are heavily profiting from children being on the site.”

A child advocacy group further stated that 80% of American children aged six to 12 years old use YouTube. Because of this, Google can collect their personal information, and earn from targeted ads without obtaining consent from their parents as required by the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act or COPPA.

 

 

COPPA and Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood are among the advocacy groups that are calling for the FTC to probe Google.